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Sir Brian Bell Foundation
Sir Brian Bell Foundation2 days ago
Don’t Wait! Donate.

Did you know that 1 blood donation can save up to 3 lives, is quick and easy and you also receive a mini physical examination every time you donate? Contact your nearest Blood Bank or Hospital and ask about blood donation. Your decision could make a world of difference for someone in need.

Why you should donate blood.
Blood is the most precious gift that anyone can give to another person — the gift of life. A decision to donate your blood can save a life, or even several if your blood is separated into its components: red cells, platelets, and plasma which can be used individually for patients with specific conditions. Regular blood donations by a sufficient number of healthy people are needed to ensure that safe blood will be available whenever and wherever it is needed. There is a constant need for regular blood supply because blood can be stored for only a limited time before use. Currently, it is thought that only 1 in 30 people give blood, but 1 in 3 people will need blood in their lifetime. Be a hero and contact your local Hospital or blood collection centre and ask about blood donation.

Who needs blood donations?
Transfusion of blood and blood products save millions of lives every year, according to the World Health Organization. Blood and blood products are essential components in the proper management of women suffering from bleeding associated with pregnancy and childbirth; children suffering from severe anaemia due to malaria and malnutrition; patients with blood and bone marrow disorders, inherited disorders of haemoglobin and immune deficiency conditions; victims of trauma, emergencies, disasters and accidents; as well as patients undergoing advanced medical and surgical procedures. Although the need for blood and blood products is universal, there is a marked difference in the level of access to safe blood and blood products across and within countries. In many countries, blood services face the additional challenge of making sufficient blood and blood products available, while also ensuring its quality and safety.

Health benefits of being a regular blood donor.
Did you know that donating blood not only saves lives but can improve the health of the blood donor too? Those who donate:
Get A Mini Physical: Every blood donor gets a mini-physical prior to donation, which includes checking your haemoglobin level, weight, and blood pressure. Your blood will also be tested for infectious diseases such as HIV, hepatitis, and syphilis. While this should not be used as a replacement for regular medical care, it can give you a good indication of your general health.
Have Better Blood Flow: Repeated blood donations may help your blood to flow better, possibly limiting damage to the lining of your blood vessels, which should result in fewer arterial blockages. Phillip DeChristopher, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Loyola University Health System blood bank stated, “what is clear is that blood donors seem not to be hospitalized so often, and if they are, they have shorter lengths of stay, and they’re less likely to get heart attacks, strokes, and cancers.”
Balances Iron Levels in Your Blood: Healthy adults usually have about 5 grams of iron in their bodies, mostly in red blood cells but also in bone marrow according to Dr. DeChristopher, when you donate a unit of blood, you lose about a quarter of a gram of iron, which gets replenished from the food you eat in the weeks after donation. This regulation of iron levels is a good thing because having too much iron could be bad news for your blood vessels. “The statistics appear to show that decreasing the amount of iron in otherwise healthy people over the long run is beneficial to their blood vessels, and diseases related to abnormalities in blood vessels, such as heart attack and stroke,” he says.
Live Longer: Studies suggest people who volunteer for altruistic reasons, i.e., to help others rather than themselves, live longer than those who volunteer for more self-centered reasons, according to the American Psychological Association.
Burns Calories: People burn approximately 650 calories per donation of one pint of blood, according to the University of California, San Diego. Reduces the Risk of Cancer: The Miller-Keystone Blood Centre says that consistent blood donations are associated with lower risks of cancers, including liver, lung, colon, and throat cancers due to the reduction in oxidative stress when iron is released from the bloodstream.
Preserves Cardiovascular Health: Blood viscosity is known to be a unifying factor for the risk of cardiovascular disease, according to the Harvard Medical School. How thick and sticky your blood is and how much friction your blood creates through the blood vessels can determine how much damage is done to the cells lining your arteries. You can reduce your blood viscosity by donating blood regularly, which eliminates the iron that may possibly oxidize in your blood. An increase in oxidative stress can be damaging to your cardiovascular system. Blood donation also reduces the risk of heart attacks and strokes, a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), researchers found that participants ages 43 to 61 had fewer heart attacks and strokes when they donated blood every six months.
A Sense of Achievement: While there are several physical benefits to donating blood, the most powerful health benefit is arguably psychological. Donating blood means that someone will receive the help they desperately need. The psychological health benefit you receive from knowing you’re helping someone in need can be just as helpful as the physical health benefit. Don’t wait, donate.

The blood donation process.
To ensure the safety of blood donation for both donors and recipients, all volunteer blood donors must be evaluated to determine their eligibility to give blood. The final determination will be made on the day of the donation. Most people are able to give blood if they are fit, healthy and not suffering from a cold, flu or other illness at the time of donation or in the previous 7 days, are aged between 16-70 years, weigh at least 50kgs, drink at least 3 glasses of water/juice in the 3 hours before donating blood and have something healthy to eat. Want to become a regular blood donor? Contact your nearest Hospital or blood collection centre today. Your decision can save a life or even several. Nervous about donating? Bring a supporting friend with you and donate together.

What to do before your blood donation.
Diet: Maintain a healthy iron level in your blood by eating iron-rich foods, such as red meat, fish, leafy greens, beans, iron-fortified cereals and bread, eggs, and raisins, which can make up for the iron you lose when donating blood.
Sleep: It’s important to get a good night’s sleep before blood donation.
Hydrate: Drink plenty of water or juice in the days before donating, which will help prepare your body for the extra loss of fluids.
Eat A Healthy Meal: Avoid foods high in fat (burgers, ice- cream, chips, etc.) before donating blood as fatty foods can affect the tests performed on your blood, i.e., for infectious diseases.
Avoid Alcohol: Avoid drinking alcohol for at least 24 hours before blood donation and at least 8 hours after.

The Day of your blood donation.
- In the 3 hours before your blood donation, drink 3 large glasses of water or juice and eat something healthy.
- Wear clothing with sleeves that can be raised above the elbow.
- Bring a list of any medications you are taking with you on the day
- Let the person taking your blood know if you have a preferred arm and show them any good veins that have been used successfully in the past to draw blood.
- Sit back and relax, listen to music, or read during the donation process.

After your blood donation.
- During the next 24-48 hours drink, plenty of liquids to replenish fluids lost through the donation and avoid alcohol.
- Avoid heavy lifting or vigorous exercise for the rest of the day.
- Avoid hot showers, sitting or standing in direct sun, and hot drinks.
- Be proud, smile; you just saved up to 3 lives.
Sir Brian Bell Foundation
Sir Brian Bell Foundation2 weeks ago
Its 2020 make your New Year’s resolution to Donate Blood.

Did you know that 1 blood donation can save up to 3 lives, is quick and easy and you also receive a mini physical examination every time you donate? Contact your nearest Blood Bank or Hospital and ask about blood donation. Your decision could make a world of difference for someone in need.

Why you should donate blood.
Blood is the most precious gift that anyone can give to another person — the gift of life. A decision to donate your blood can save a life, or even several if your blood is separated into its components: red cells, platelets, and plasma which can be used individually for patients with specific conditions. Regular blood donations by a sufficient number of healthy people are needed to ensure that safe blood will be available whenever and wherever it is needed. There is a constant need for regular blood supply because blood can be stored for only a limited time before use. Currently, it is thought that only 1 in 30 people give blood, but 1 in 3 people will need blood in their lifetime. Be a hero and contact your local Hospital or blood collection centre and ask about blood donation.

Who needs blood donations?
Transfusion of blood and blood products save millions of lives every year, according to the World Health Organization. Blood and blood products are essential components in the proper management of women suffering from bleeding associated with pregnancy and childbirth; children suffering from severe anaemia due to malaria and malnutrition; patients with blood and bone marrow disorders, inherited disorders of haemoglobin and immune deficiency conditions; victims of trauma, emergencies, disasters and accidents; as well as patients undergoing advanced medical and surgical procedures. Although the need for blood and blood products is universal, there is a marked difference in the level of access to safe blood and blood products across and within countries. In many countries, blood services face the additional challenge of making sufficient blood and blood products available, while also ensuring its quality and safety.

Health benefits of being a regular blood donor.
Did you know that donating blood not only saves lives but can improve the health of the blood donor too? Those who donate:
Get A Mini Physical: Every blood donor gets a mini-physical prior to donation, which includes checking your haemoglobin level, weight, and blood pressure. Your blood will also be tested for infectious diseases such as HIV, hepatitis, and syphilis. While this should not be used as a replacement for regular medical care, it can give you a good indication of your general health.
Have Better Blood Flow: Repeated blood donations may help your blood to flow better, possibly limiting damage to the lining of your blood vessels, which should result in fewer arterial blockages. Phillip DeChristopher, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Loyola University Health System blood bank stated, “what is clear is that blood donors seem not to be hospitalized so often, and if they are, they have shorter lengths of stay, and they’re less likely to get heart attacks, strokes, and cancers.”
Balances Iron Levels in Your Blood: Healthy adults usually have about 5 grams of iron in their bodies, mostly in red blood cells but also in bone marrow according to Dr. DeChristopher, when you donate a unit of blood, you lose about a quarter of a gram of iron, which gets replenished from the food you eat in the weeks after donation. This regulation of iron levels is a good thing because having too much iron could be bad news for your blood vessels. “The statistics appear to show that decreasing the amount of iron in otherwise healthy people over the long run is beneficial to their blood vessels, and diseases related to abnormalities in blood vessels, such as heart attack and stroke,” he says.
Live Longer: Studies suggest people who volunteer for altruistic reasons, i.e., to help others rather than themselves, live longer than those who volunteer for more self-centered reasons, according to the American Psychological Association.
Burns Calories: People burn approximately 650 calories per donation of one pint of blood, according to the University of California, San Diego. Reduces the Risk of Cancer: The Miller-Keystone Blood Centre says that consistent blood donations are associated with lower risks of cancers, including liver, lung, colon, and throat cancers due to the reduction in oxidative stress when iron is released from the bloodstream.
Preserves Cardiovascular Health: Blood viscosity is known to be a unifying factor for the risk of cardiovascular disease, according to the Harvard Medical School. How thick and sticky your blood is and how much friction your blood creates through the blood vessels can determine how much damage is done to the cells lining your arteries. You can reduce your blood viscosity by donating blood regularly, which eliminates the iron that may possibly oxidize in your blood. An increase in oxidative stress can be damaging to your cardiovascular system. Blood donation also reduces the risk of heart attacks and strokes, a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), researchers found that participants ages 43 to 61 had fewer heart attacks and strokes when they donated blood every six months.
A Sense of Achievement: While there are several physical benefits to donating blood, the most powerful health benefit is arguably psychological. Donating blood means that someone will receive the help they desperately need. The psychological health benefit you receive from knowing you’re helping someone in need can be just as helpful as the physical health benefit. Don’t wait, donate.

The blood donation process.
To ensure the safety of blood donation for both donors and recipients, all volunteer blood donors must be evaluated to determine their eligibility to give blood. The final determination will be made on the day of the donation. Most people are able to give blood if they are fit, healthy and not suffering from a cold, flu or other illness at the time of donation or in the previous 7 days, are aged between 16-70 years, weigh at least 50kgs, drink at least 3 glasses of water/juice in the 3 hours before donating blood and have something healthy to eat. Want to become a regular blood donor? Contact your nearest Hospital or blood collection centre today. Your decision can save a life or even several. Nervous about donating? Bring a supporting friend with you and donate together.

What to do before your blood donation.
Diet: Maintain a healthy iron level in your blood by eating iron-rich foods, such as red meat, fish, leafy greens, beans, iron-fortified cereals and bread, eggs, and raisins, which can make up for the iron you lose when donating blood.
Sleep: It’s important to get a good night’s sleep before blood donation.
Hydrate: Drink plenty of water or juice in the days before donating, which will help prepare your body for the extra loss of fluids.
Eat A Healthy Meal: Avoid foods high in fat (burgers, ice- cream, chips, etc.) before donating blood as fatty foods can affect the tests performed on your blood, i.e., for infectious diseases.
Avoid Alcohol: Avoid drinking alcohol for at least 24 hours before blood donation and at least 8 hours after.

The Day of your blood donation.
- In the 3 hours before your blood donation, drink 3 large glasses of water or juice and eat something healthy.
- Wear clothing with sleeves that can be raised above the elbow.
- Bring a list of any medications you are taking with you on the day
- Let the person taking your blood know if you have a preferred arm and show them any good veins that have been used successfully in the past to draw blood.
- Sit back and relax, listen to music, or read during the donation process.

After your blood donation.
- During the next 24-48 hours drink, plenty of liquids to replenish fluids lost through the donation and avoid alcohol.
- Avoid heavy lifting or vigorous exercise for the rest of the day.
- Avoid hot showers, sitting or standing in direct sun, and hot drinks.
- Be proud, smile; you just saved up to 3 lives.

 

Supporting Anglicare PNG

Sir Brian Bell Foundation CEO Bronwyn Wright talks to NBC PNG about the foundations support of K200,000 to Anglicare PNG Inc to address HIV/AIDs in Papua New Guinea.

Interview with Ian Clough on PNG Tonight

WOW, a great interview with the Executive Director, Mr. Ian Clough, Brian Bell Group of Companies and Director, Sir Brian Bell Foundation. We are sure that he’ll be autographing T-Shirts and posters in no time… this family has done so much for PNG and the legacy is continuing.

Welcoming the Swedish U20 FIFA Female World Cup Team
Chairman of Brian Bell Group and Director of SBBF, Trevan G. Clough welcoming the Swedish U20 FIFA Female World Cup Team to PNG. He offered a warm welcome to the team and wished them all the very best during the competition and for their stay while in PNG.
The Right Pitch

By Gorethy Kenneth, Post Courier 21/02/17

DRIVEN for success and looking to expand her knowledge base at Draper University, this 27-year-old lass that you will read about is reaping the benefits of following her dreams.

Roberta Morlin, 27, from Manus and Bougainville, is an exceptionally talented and driven young woman with her very own Papua New Guinea story.

read more

 

Sir Brian Bell Foundation Helps St John

The Sir Brian Bell Foundation has provided support to St John Ambulance with K100,000 funding assistance to maintain its operations while working to secure ongoing financial commitments.

read more

 

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